QSS 11 | Benefits Of Being Coach

 

One of the most awesome benefits of becoming a coach is that this line of work, maybe more so than any other profession out there, gives you the freedom to work as much or as little as you like from virtually anywhere in the world at a pace that you have complete control over. In this episode, Christy Whitman gives a glimpse into a day in the life of a life coach so that you have a sense of how coaches typically schedule their time to create both a thriving practice and a balanced and truly enjoyable lifestyle.

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Benefits Of Being A Coach – What Is The Lifestyle Of A Life Coach? by Christy Whitman

In this short installment, I want to give you a glimpse into a day in the life of a life coach so that you have a sense of how coaches typically schedule their time to create both a thriving practice and a balanced and truly enjoyable lifestyle. One of the most awesome benefits of becoming a coach is that this line of work maybe more so than maybe any other profession out there, it really gives you the freedom to work as much or as little as you like from virtually anywhere in the world. It pays that you have complete control over. As someone who’s made the decision several years ago to walk away from a lucrative job in Corporate America to pursue coaching full-time, I can tell you from experience that being a professional coach provides a quality of life that most people only dream about. The hours are flexible, the work itself enhances your own personal growth and development, and there’s virtually no limit to the amount of money that you can make.

The act of coaching another person is as uplifting to you as it is to them. Click To Tweet

In addition, you get to be your own boss, set your own schedule, determine your hourly rate, and even decide when it’s time to give yourself a raise, all the while knowing that you are changing people’s lives for the better. What does a day of the life of a coach typically look like? If you’re like me, and most of the people I’ve trained and certified, in the beginning, as you’re transitioning from your current job to being a coach, there will likely be a period of time where you’re still working at your day job and coaching people in the evenings and on the weekends. In case it sounds overwhelming or not workable for you, I want to reassure you that coaching others in your free time is not at all like working two jobs or putting in two back-to-back shifts at your current position. This is because the act of coaching another person is so uplifting to you as it is to them.

As a coach, you’re standing in the highest possibility for each of your clients and aligning yourself with the fulfillment of the outcomes and goals that are most meaningful to them. Unlike traditional forms of therapy where the focus is on what isn’t working in the client’s life and why, coaching is completely future-oriented. All the wealth of tools and resources you’ll learn in the course of your training are designed to support your clients in getting where they are to where they want to be. As a result of this future focus, you feel uplifted and enlivened after each session, not depleted or drained. This brings me to another key concept of a successful coach’s daily routine.

QSS 11 | Benefits Of Being Coach

Benefits Of Being Coach: To be successful as a coach, you must build into your lifestyle a generous amount of time that is devoted to your own self-care.

 

To be successful as a coach, you must build into your lifestyle a generous amount of time that is devoted to your own self-care. Self-care means different things to different people, but some of the practices that I guide my coaches to follow include meditation and visualization, physical exercise and practicing inner processes that help us to more deliberately alter or adjust our own energy field. Regular practice of self-care is so vital because as coaches, we’re literally holding the space for our clients to bring forth the best versions of themselves and we can’t hold this space unless we’re also at our best.

When I was a full-time coach, my self-care routine included morning and afternoon meditation, listening to uplifting music throughout the day, planning out my meals to fuel my energy and metabolism, getting some form of physical exercise, and making sure I carved out blocks of time between clients to spend time with my young boys. Other coaches I know make it a habit of spending time in nature, devoting time to gardening, dancing, or some other hobby that they enjoy. Each coach finds what feels best for them. Most of the practices that we teach in our QSCA training are focused around sourcing ourselves from within so that we can approach every session and every interaction outside of work as well with an abundance of energy and intention. I hope you’ve enjoyed this glimpse into the day of the life of a coach. I’d love to hear your thoughts or questions on what we’ve discussed. If you’ve enjoyed this, please share it with your friends and colleagues.

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